What Are ND & UV Filters? Photography With ND Filters!
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What Are ND & UV Filters? Photography With ND Filters!

24 views • Sep 19th, 2020

What Are ND & UV Filters? Photography With ND Filters!

Outdoor photography comes with lots of challenges, one of the prominent issues is the lighting and its control, hence an additional accessory comes into play which is known to us as Neutral Density or the ND filters and Ultraviolet or UV filters.

This is a complete guide about both the types of filters, their purpose, uses, and the product reviews of the popular brands in this segment.

What Are Neutral Density (ND Filters) And Why They Are Used?

A neutral density (ND) filter is a type of grey filter that is easily attachable to a camera lens,  to control the amount of light entering the camera’s sensor. Since a neutral density filter is neutral, it doesn’t have any impact on image color, contrast, or sharpness.

By reducing or blocking out light to your camera lens, a neutral density filter lets you manipulate your photos to achieve really creative results. ND filters are available according to how much light they restrict from your camera. This is measured by f-stops.

ND Filters photography The smaller the f-stop number, such as f-2, the lighter the filter lets in, and the larger the aperture. The most common f-stop densities are those with two, three, or four stops. If one wants to block out more light and slow things down, one can choose a darker f-stop with a higher number.

One can also combine ND filters to achieve a larger f-stop and boost the density strength, but be careful not to end up with an undesirable vignetting effect. If one uses a high-density filter to get long exposures, he should consider using a tripod with his camera.

Some photographers use individual ND filters with different f-stops to influence light exposure, but you can also get variable ND filters which are a single filter that can be rotated to cover a number off-stops. This offers great flexibility. It also means you don’t need to keep changing filters every time you want to alter light levels.

Read more at Abhishek Saraswat