January 03rd, 2024

How to talk so that people listen? 7 super ideas.

How to talk so that people listen? 7 super ideas.
Create that impression forever by learning “how to talk so that people listen”. We’ve all been there. We’re in front of people and we wanna be not only heard but also listened to. Now, there are many ways to think about this. But, is there a secret? Well, let’s find out. There must a structured way to think about this. Well, you’re in luck today as we talk about 7 ideas in this blog. Here goes: Know your audience: It’s important to consider the demographics, interests, and knowledge level of your audience when preparing a talk. This can help you tailor your message and delivery to better engage them. Research suggests that speakers who are able to establish a connection with their audience are more likely to hold their attention and be perceived as more credible and likable. Use storytelling: Stories are a powerful tool for engaging an audience, as they help to illustrate points and create an emotional connection. According to research, stories are 22 times more memorable than facts alone, and can increase the persuasiveness of a message by up to 43%. When using storytelling in a talk, be sure to choose stories that are relevant to your message and audience. Use body language and gestures: Nonverbal cues can be just as important as the words you use in engaging an audience. Studies have shown that body language and gestures can significantly impact how an audience perceives a speaker and their message. For example, open and confident body language can make a speaker appear more likable and competent, while closed or nervous body language can have the opposite effect. Use rhetorical devices: Rhetorical devices such as rhetorical questions, repetition, and rhetorical triangles can help draw people in and keep their attention. Research has shown that using rhetorical devices can increase the persuasiveness of a message and make it more memorable. However, it’s important to use them sparingly and effectively, as overuse can become distracting and even annoying to an audience. Engage your audience: Engaging your audience in a talk can help keep them interested and make the experience more interactive and dynamic. Research suggests that audience engagement can improve recall of information, increase perceived value of a presentation, and enhance overall enjoyment. Some ways to engage an audience include asking for their input or opinions, inviting them to participate in activities or discussions, and using interactive multimedia. Use multimedia: Using multimedia such as slides, videos, or other visual aids can be a great way to enhance a talk and keep an audience interested. However, it’s important to use these tools effectively and not overdo it. Research has found that using multimedia can improve retention of information and make a presentation more engaging, but it can also be distracting if not used appropriately. Practice: Practice is key to giving a confident and engaging talk. Research suggests that speakers who are well-prepared and rehearsed are more likely to hold an audience’s attention and be perceived as more credible. Practice will also help you become more comfortable and natural when delivering your talk, which can help you connect with your audience. Now that you’ve learnt a thing or two about how to talk, it is natural to explore further. It’s that innate human itch to keep learning more and we understand that urge. Here are some books and videos that may be helpful in learning more about how to talk so that people are interested: “Talk Like TED: The 9 Public-Speaking Secrets of the World’s Top Minds” by Carmine Gallo “The Art of Public Speaking” by Stephen E. Lucas “Influence: The Psychology of Persuasion” by Robert Cialdini “To Sell Is Human: The Surprising Truth About Moving Others” by Daniel H. Pink “The Confidence Code: The Science and Art of Self-Assurance—What Women Should Know” by Katty Kay and Claire Shipman TED Talks on public speaking: https://www.ted.com/topics/public+speaking Coursera’s “Effective Communication: Writing, Design, and Presentation Specialization”: https://www.coursera.org/specializations/effective-communication “The Power of Vulnerability” by Brené Brown: https://www.ted.com/talks/brene_brown_on_vulnerability “The Secret to Great Public Speaking” by Simon Sinek: https://www.ted.com/talks/simon_sinek_how_great_leaders_inspire_action “How to Speak So That People Want to Listen” by Julian Treasure: https://www.ted.com/talks/julian_treasure_how_to_speak_so_that_people_want_to_listen These resources aren’t exhaustive by any means and are intended to guide you to think effectively about improve your communication skills. I hope they are helpful in learning more about how to engage an audience when giving a talk. Good luck! Freelancers like to work out of Work Theater, our coworking space in Bangalore. Learn more about our coworking space on Think Remote.
Like (0) Comments (0)



0 Comments Add Your Comment



Post a Comment

To leave a comment, please Login or Register